Dieter Hardock

Solutions to Thermally Efficient Building Envelope Details

Building envelope thermal performance is greatly affected by thermal bridging, or localized areas of increased heat flow through walls and roofs. Mitigating the impact of thermal bridging is not only necessary to reduce energy consumption but is also an important consideration for minimizing the risk of condensation on cold surfaces and for maintaining occupant comfort.

As part of new Building Envelope Thermal Bridging (BETB) Guide, various construction details have been analyzed to evaluate traditional thermal bridges and various solutions provided by Schöck Isokorb. Please find the report here.

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The BETB Guide explores how the building industry can meet the challenges of reducing energy use in buildings, in part by effectively accounting for the impact of thermal bridging. It outlines how to effectively account for thermal bridging. For practitioners, it provides a catalog of common building envelope assemblies and interface details, as well as their associated thermal performance data.

In this new report provided by Morrison Hershfield, the most critical thermal bridges and their solutions have been evaluated, that means concrete balconies, concrete parapets and steel extensions connected to interior steel and concrete structures.

Table shows the considered construction methods

Table shows the considered construction methods

Table shows the thermal results for heat transmittance (heat loss)

Table shows the thermal results for heat transmittance (heat loss)

Table shows the thermal results for surface temperatures and the critical relative humidity for condensation

Table shows the thermal results for surface temperatures and the critical relative humidity for condensation

In the report, both the evaluation of heat transmittance and surface temperatures combined with the according risk of condensation has been evaluated.

The results show significant improvements by implementing Schöck Isokorb.


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3 Comments zu "Solutions to Thermally Efficient Building Envelope Details"

Thiago Ewerton de Castro Dias wrote at 04-29-2015 by 10:32 am

I am an student at ANHAGUERA UNIDERP – CAMPO GRANDE/MS (BRASIL),
studing to become a Civil Engineer and also looking for sources of
knowledgement all the time. I’ve started to study the BETB Guide
and even now I’d like to thank Mr. Morrison Hershfield for this
report and Schöck for sending this incredable newsletter. In this
opportunity I’d like to say that Schöck is the Company I would use
in my Course Conclusion Work by 1º/2017. If, of course, I’m
allowed. Looking foward to see new reports. Thanks again, kind
regards and I wish all the best for everybody.

Dieter Hardock wrote at 04-29-2015 by 3:48 pm

Hi Thiago, thanks for your positive feedback. What is your course
conclusion work about? We can further talk via Email,
Dieter.Hardock@Schoeck.de. Looking forward to reading from you.
Regards Dieter

Keith Robinson wrote at 09-08-2015 by 3:54 pm

One suggested small improvement to the step down details, could
benefit from a membrane strip between the balcony slab and the
interior slab step-up. This would prevent runoff water from
accumulating when snow is melting against the building face from
running into the joint – potentially freezing within the joint or
soffit below – preventing freeze-thaw damage to the concrete. The
membrane would be covered in final construction with the wall
construction or door-frame assembly.

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